Freebies : Football textures

This was a prop I made for the Conrad build but unlike most of the other things I’ve made it’s just textures that can be applied to a standard SL spherical prim.

Football1_001

When applied to a sphere prim you’ll need to rotate the textures 90 degrees in the texture panel. For some reason SL places the pole at the side of the texture.

The basic textures are the diffuse and normals:

Football diffuse

Football diffuse

Football Normals

Football Normals

I’m also going to include the ambient occlusion layer and the pattern blocking texture so you can mix up your own textures yourself:

Ambient occlusion

Ambient occlusion

Pattern blocking

Pattern blocking

Feel free to use these textures for whatever you like so long as you include a link back to this blog with anything you distribute.

Miscellaneous hints and freebies

Until recently pretty much all of the content I’ve made for SL has been stuff that you wear. I was pretty happy with that state of affairs until I built a shop and discovered (or, really, re-discovered) how much fun it can be to build props and environments.

With the Advanced Lighting Model (hereafter, “ALM”, ‘cos I’m sure not typing all that out every time) in the viewer there is now much more opportunity to add depth and atmosphere to a build, but most people don’t really use it to its fullest extent because not all SL users will get the benefit. I built my shop trying to make the most of the cool bits of ALM but always with an eye on making it degrade gracefully for non-ALM users. Visit the store and judge for yourself how well I succeeded.

That build prodded me to experiment a bit more and see how far the ALM could carry some atmosphere. To that end I’ve started building something, a short experience, that tries to use no-holds-barred ALM to create something memorable.

It’s part technology demonstrator, part just me experimenting and a small part me evangelising on what’s possible with SL in 2014 and pushing the limits to find what would be great to enhance in SL2.0 (we’re all dooooomed! etc, etc – it’s totally a five-o doom). I may never finish it; all you may ever see of it is a few pictures on this blog. Still, what the hell – I’m having fun with it now, so let’s see how it turns out.

I want the build itself to be as open as possible, so despite it being very early days, I’m releasing a set of generic (i.e. not tied to specific meshes) textures that I’ve made for it. This time it’s some diamond plate for the non-slip flooring:

Normal Map

Normal Map

Stretched normal map for bigger bumps!

Stretched normal map for bigger bumps!

Ambient occlusion

Ambient occlusion

Above are two normal maps with different levels of elevation for the diamonds and an ambient occlusion map for the diffuse channel, all of which tile nicely. These textures are released under a CC BY 4.0 license, so feel free to use them in your own builds and products so long as you provide attribution and a link to this blog post.

So, where is all this effort going? It’s going into the mysteriously abandoned hulk of the USCSS Conrad.

Welcome aboard

Welcome aboard

This research vessel belonging to the Aleph Corporation was lost three years ago in mysterious circumstances. Mistakes were made.

USCSS-Conrad2

Words can’t express how safe you’ll be on the other side of this door

Happy Easter!

I decided on Friday that I should really make something seasonal. Deciding this just as the holiday began may not have been the best idea but it beats my usual Christmas schedule of thinking “Hey, I should do a Kcreations Christmas gift!” around February 3rd.

So, in a flurry of desperately hurried development, I made the Kcreations Bondage Egg!

Behold!

Behold!

You can pick it up for free at the Kcreations main store above the Little Shop of Kink in Lineside.

The egg is something you can rez on the ground. If someone sits on it they will be imprisoned inside until someone releases them with a click. When they’re released they’ll be locked into a set of fitted mesh steel shackles in one pose or another. The time they’ll remain restrained for is set at random by the egg, but varies between ten and thirty minutes.

Just a little bit of kinky fun for Easter!

Avatar Pants Template

Let’s get this out of the way first: I’m British, so pants are already something you wear under things. We have no separate concept of underpants – underpants and pants are the same thing. We Brits have no truck with this French-influenced colonial nonsense; nor have we since Queen Victoria herself standardised things with the 1866 Royal Commission on Unmentionable Nomenclature. For more information on this subject see my upcoming book: The Epistemology of Undergarments in Three Volumes.

America, whence Second Life comes, of course refers to trousers as pants, much to my annoyance. Nevertheless, I shall swallow my pride and refer to them as pants for the remainder of this post. I will spend some extra time this evening spelling colour with a “u” and drinking tea to make amends.

I mentioned in my very first post on this blog that I’ve been playing around with making avatar textures from cloth-simmed meshes. I made a T-Shirt and put the resulting template textures up here for anyone to have a play with. This time I’ve done a similar thing with the pants template:

Rocking the leather pants template in-world

Rocking the leather pants template in-world

These textures are made by taking a high-poly cloth-simulated mesh and then using surface baking to transfer all the details down onto the avatar template. The original mesh is about 130,000 polys, so baking it down to one texture is quite the saving in overhead despite losing some of the detail.

High-poly mesh in Lightwave

High-poly mesh in Lightwave

This time I’m giving away the basic diffuse template and something parhaps a bit more interesting: A baked leather template. Without further ado, then:

Diffuse texture

Diffuse texture

Leather texture

Leather texture

Neither of these textures have any details like pockets or seams, so they’re not really ready to go straight into something you can use, but they should provide some useful extra detail and texture to anything you’re working on already.

I’m releasing these textures under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license – meaning you can use them pretty much however you like so long as you link back to this post and mention my name (Kat Fetisov, in case you’ve forgotten in the time it took to get this far down the page).

The textures are provided at a resolution of 1024 x 1024 to give you a little more flexibility with things – scale them down to 512 x 512 before uploading them for use on avatar garments.

 

 

Avatar T-Shirt Template

For a while now I’ve been playing around more and more with cloth simulation to make mesh clothing. It’s a powerful tool for creating a natural looking drape for fabric around an avatar’s body but to get the best results it’s hard to keep the poly count down.

The last couple of days I’ve been messing around with creating cloth-simmed meshes and then baking their textures down onto the avatar’s mesh to produce an “old fashioned” piece of SL clothing that still takes some advantage of the cloth simulation.

The piece of clothing I’ve been working with was a simple T-Shirt and now that I’ve got something that seems pleasing I’m going to share all the textures with you – because I’m just that generous 😉

TShirt Template Example

I’m releasing these files under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 license. This means that you’re free to:

  • Copy, distribute, display and perform the work
  • To make derivative works
  • To make commercial use of the work

So long as you give me credit, go nuts 🙂

For now I’ll just include the template files – I may give a more technical breakdown of how I made them in a later post.

There are four templates here:

  • Diffuse – this contains shadows and shading
  • Ambient Occlusion – this contains more shading information, different to the diffuse layer
  • Cloth – this is an unshaded cotton-like cloth layer to give the shirt some texture
  • Alpha – a black & white alpha map that defines the edges of the texture
Cloth template

Cloth template

Diffuse template

Diffuse template

Ambient Occlusion template

Ambient Occlusion template

Alpha template

Alpha template

I’m providing all these textures in 1024 x 1024 resolution, bigger than the 512 x 512 allowed for SL’s clothing layer textures, but I find it’s always better to have a big texture you can scale down than a small one you have to scale up.

These templates are designed to be blended together in a graphics editor like Photoshop. The way I work with these is to start with a square image filled with a plain base colour. Add the template layers on top of this background and set them to the Multiply blend mode. Play with the opacity sliders for a bit until the effects of each layer seem to add up nicely (I have no scientific method for this, just my eyeballs) then save out a merged image and apply the alpha map to it as a mask:

Example of merging template layers

Example of merging template layers

Scale the resulting texture down to 512 x 512 pixels, upload it to Second Life and Bob’s your uncle 🙂